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The Man Who Changed Technology Forever Succumbs to Cancer at 56

Before I go to bed I wanted to write a little something about Steve Jobs, the legendary co-founder and chairman of Apple Inc., who passed away on yesterday after a long battle with pancreatic cancer at the age of 56.

I don’t really know a ton about Jobs other than what I’ve learned from watching various news shows over the last few hours. The only thing that really needs to be said about him is that more people around the world probably own his products than those of any other popular brand. I’m sure about 1 in every 5 people you encounter on a daily basis (school, work, shopping, etc) owns an iPod, iPad, iPhone or a Mac computer.

I learned that he was diagnosed with cancer around the age of 49 and anyone who knows anything about cancer knows that pancreatic cancer is among the most painful and quickest. It’s the same cancer that ended the life of actor Patrick Swayze in 2009. Yet, Jobs continued to create new inventions and revolutionize the face of technology right up until the very end. The way he lived his life in the face of such odds should serve as a lesson to us all. If for nothing else, this man changed the very way we think about music; he single-handedly changed the music industry.

His death was mentioned on every major cable news show last night and was given extensive coverage on CNN and CNBC. I’m sure all of the morning news shows and every major newspaper will have lengthy stories on him today. Prominent national figures such as President Barack Obama, Walt Disney President Bob Iber, billionaire investor Warren Buffet, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, director Steven Spielberg, and Microsoft founder Bill Gates, all released statements shortly following his death.

For all he accomplished in a lifetime that was cut drastically short (and as a college dropout nonetheless!), the one thing I wonder is what else would he had accomplished? With the type of drive he had to succeed, it’s very likely he would’ve continued to push the boundaries of technology for many more years to come.

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